10.1353/hrq.2014.0042">
 

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2014

Abstract

Sex equality—a significant contribution to the international human rights canon—was one of the legitimating principles of socialist states in Eastern Europe and, at least formally, of their post-socialist democratic successors. Why then has the subject been ignored or deeply marginalized in post-socialist legal education? Using socio-legal analysis to establish a legitimation or delegitimation dynamic regarding law in theory and practice in both eras, the author provides answers to this question and suggests various options for reforming post-socialist legal education to provide adequate training in the subject of women’s rights consistent with states’ international and regional human rights obligations.

Publication Title

Human Rights Quarterly

First Page

507

Last Page

568

Comments

© 2014 The Johns Hopkins University Press. This article was first published in Human Rights Quarterly 36.3 (2014), 507–568. Reprinted with permission by Johns Hopkins University Press.

Required Text

© 2014 The Johns Hopkins University Press. This article was first published in Human Rights Quarterly 36.3 (2014), 507–568. Reprinted with permission by Johns Hopkins University Press.

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