Twentieth-Century Legal Metaphors for Self and Society

Title

Twentieth-Century Legal Metaphors for Self and Society

Files

Description

Published in Looking Back at Law's Century, Austin Sarat, Bryant Garth & Robert A. Kagan, eds.

Contract was a powerful trope at the nineteenth century’s end, representing society as a dynamic field of competing and transacting wills. This paper traces the emergence of other legal metaphors for society in twentieth century American legal thought, social thought, and popular culture. The newer legal metaphors included interests, claims, process, institutions, and transactions. Taken together, these metaphors testified to a new experience of the self as a contingent performance enabled by an institutional medium or network.

Publication Date

2002

Publisher

Cornell University Press

ISBN

978-0-8014-3957-5

First Page

151

Last Page

184

Keywords

Law & Literature, Law & Society, Legal History

Disciplines

Law | Law and Society | Legal History

Twentieth-Century Legal Metaphors for Self and Society

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