Who's Afraid of Methodology? Advocating a Methodological Turn in Legal Geography

Title

Who's Afraid of Methodology? Advocating a Methodological Turn in Legal Geography

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Description

Published as Chapter 5 in The Expanding Spaces of Law: a Timely Legal Geography, Irus Braverman, Nicholas Blomley, David Delaney & Alexandre Kedar, eds.

Alongside the push to expand legal geography into new spaces and temporalities “out there,” this chapter proposes an inward expansion: a reflection on how we come to write what we write rather than where, when, and why we do so. Such greater awareness to the craftsmanship of our scholarship will pay off in a range of ways and, most importantly, by increasing our methodological diversity and interdisciplinarity. The chapter reflects on the pitfalls and virtues of my own zoo ethnography with the aim of inviting legal geographers to explore how they have crafted and choose to craft their own research. The chapter argues that because of our unique training in the nexus of law and geography, we are well equipped to explore administrative structures and cultures. Institutional and bureaucratic ethnographies should thus perform a more important role in legal geography.

Publication Date

2014

Publisher

Stanford University Press

ISBN

9780804787185

First Page

120

Last Page

141

Keywords

legal geography, methodology, ethnography, studying-up, multi-sites, zoos

Disciplines

Anthropology | Jurisprudence | Law | Law and Society

Who's Afraid of Methodology? Advocating a Methodological Turn in Legal Geography

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